Augusta University follows the best practices guidelines as established by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the GA Department of Public Health (DPH).  The Student Health Services staff can initially evaluate you and determine your relative risk of having monkeypox based on your signs and symptoms.  Call 706-721-3448 to speak to our triage nurse for more information.  The Student Health Clinic does not provide testing nor have the monkeypox vaccine. Testing and the vaccine are available through the Richmond County Department of Public Health, 950 Laney Walker Blvd.; call 706-667-4342 for more information.

Monkeypox is an infectious disease caused by the monkeypox virus, a member of the Orthopoxviral genus in the family Poxviridae. It is related to smallpox but less severe; it is not related to chickenpox.  Monkeypox is rarely fatal.

  • fever
  • headache
  • muscle aches, backache
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • respiratory symptoms (sore throat, nasal congestion, cough)
  • rash that can look like pimples or blisters that appear on the face, inside the mouth, and on other parts of the body, particularly extremities and genitalia.

Monkeypox can spread from person to person through direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. It can also be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact, or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling, or sex. Touching items (such as clothing or linens) that previously touched the infectious rash or body fluids is another way monkeypox spreads buthas not been identified to be a common mode of transmission in this outbreak or for monkeypox in general.

A person with monkeypox can spread it to others from the onset of symptoms until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. Over 85% of individuals do not require hospitalization; special air handling is not required.

Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.  Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used. Wash your hands with soap and water frequently or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating, after using the bathroom, or touching your face.(see FAQ handout)

See a healthcare provider if you notice a new or unexplained rash or other monkeypox symptoms. Avoid close contact with others, including pets, until you are checked by a healthcare provider. 

It is very unlikely. Monkeypox can spread from person to person through direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. It can also be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling, or sex.  It is always a good idea to wipe down gym equipment and other surfaces used by others, before and after use. Avoid going to class or the gym if you have any rash or symptoms of monkeypox.

Monkeypox can more accurately be described as "sexually transmissible.  Sex is probably the most common but just one of the ways that monkeypox can be spread. See "How do you get monkeypox?"

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.
  • Do not kiss, hug, cuddle, or have sex with someone with monkeypox.
  • Avoid contact with objects or materials that have been used by a person with monkeypox (e.g., bedding, towels, clothing, personal hygiene products, etc.).
  • Wahs your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face, and after you use the bathroom.

You should see a healthcare provider to determine if you need to be tested for monkeypox.  If you do need to be tested, you should contact the Richmond County Dept. of Public Health at 706-667-4342 for more information about testing and vaccination. Your partner should also contact the Richmond County Dept. of Public Health for follow-up. 

Testing and the vaccine are available through the Richmond County Department of Public Health, 950 Laney Walker Blvd.; call 706-667-4342 for more information.

  • Call the Student Health Services at 706-721-3448 or the Richmond County Health Department at 706-667-4342.
  • Visit the CDC website
  • Visit the GA DPH website